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Diver Alert Network (DAN)

Scuba Bula is proud to support DAN Asia-Pacific (DAN AP). The Divers Alert Network (DAN) is a global network of not-for-profit, member-based, dive safety organisations working for the safety of all divers through education, research and training.

DAN AP provides Worldwide Emergency Evacuation Coverage and optional Dive Injury (Treatment) Insurance Services for Members. In addition the organisation is responsible for funding and/or manning 24-hour diving emergency hotlines throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

DAN AP is a part of the International DAN Federation of Dive Safety Organisations with worldwide Membership presently exceeding 300,000.

Wherever members live or dive around the world they have peace of mind knowing that DAN is available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week to assist in the event of an accident/illness.

Why is it so important that as Divers we are protected with DAN Membership & Dive Injury (Treatment) Insurance?It’s all about being prepared for the unexpected, namely dive accidents and illnesses. It’s essential that divers have a reputable organisation to call that will be able to co-ordinate a rescue effort and get them to the most appropriate treatment for their injury or illness. And then there is the issue of cost. DAN protection ensures the diver will not be lumbered with the burden of a potentially hefty invoice in the event of an accident or illness.

An Example

In 2007 DAN was involved in the evacuation of a paralysed diver from the Solomon Islands to Australia. The evacuation cost was around AUD$90,000 (as an aircraft had to be sourced from far away). In addition, the treatment costs were in excess of US$30,000, plus on-going expenses.

The essence of DAN Membership & Dive Injury (Treatment) Insurance is about being prepared. DAN offers members peace-of-mind, which comes from knowing they have the experts in diver accident management to call in the event of a diving accident or illness.

To learn more about DAN, or to become a member, visit www.danasiapacific.org

Signing up as a DAN AP Member?

Be sure to enter DS-0167 in the Referral Field!

DAN Courses

Oxygen First Aid for Scuba Diving Injuries

This course represents entry level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public to better recognise possible dive related injuries and to provide emergency oxygen first aid while activating the local emergency medical services (EMS) and/or arranging for evacuation to the nearest available medical facility.

Course Objective

The course is designed to train and educate the general diving public in the techniques of using oxygen as first aid for a suspected dive injury. In addition, this course will introduce novice divers to the fundamentals of recognising diving injury signs and symptoms, response and management. This program also provides an excellent opportunity for experienced divers and instructors to continue their education.

The DAN Oxygen Provider course is not designed to train lay persons to provide oxygen to the general public. While the medical standards and equipment are the same regarding the emergency use of oxygen for both divers and non-divers, the DAN Oxygen Provider course does not prepare individuals to respond to the ill or injured member of the general public by using emergency oxygen.

Learning Objectives

Course participants must be familiar with the signs and symptoms of major diving injuries including near drowning and decompression illnesses (arterial gas embolism and decompression sickness).

Course participants must demonstrate proper deployment, assembly, disassembly, and use of all components of the DAN Oxygen Unit. This includes use of the demand inhalator valve/mask, constant flow (delivering oxygen up to 25 lpm), non-rebreather mask and oronasal resuscitation mask with supplemental oxygen inlet.

The course participant must demonstrate skill and confidence while providing emergency oxygen to simulated injured divers by:

  • Assessing the scene and oxygen provider safety
  • Deploying and operating the DAN Oxygen Unit
  • Selecting and preparing the appropriate oxygen mask
  • Operating the DAN Oxygen Unit and using these oxygen delivery devices:
    • Demand inhalator valve and mask
    • Constant-flow, non-rebreather mask
    • Oronasal resuscitation mask with supplemental oxygen inlet
  • Identification of the main components of the DAN Oxygen Unit
    • Oxygen cylinder and valve
    • Multi-function regulator
    • "T" handle
    • Handwheel/wrench
    • Oxygen washer
    • Constant-flow controller
    • Intermediate (White) pressure hose
    • Pressure activated check valve (in threaded outlet)
    • Demand inhalator valve
    • Oronasal mask
    • Non-rebreather mask
    • Oronasal resuscitation mask with supplemental oxygen inlet

First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life

This course represents entry level training designed to educate the general diving (and qualified non-diving) public to identify hazardous marine life, to recognise possible injuries caused by hazardous marine life, to provide first aid for hazardous marine life injuries and to avoid hazardous marine life injuries.

Course Objective

The objectives of this course are to train and educate the general diving public and interested non-divers in the first aid techniques for a suspected hazardous marine life injury. In addition, this course will introduce divers to the identification of potentially hazardous marine life and how to avoid hazardous marine life injuries. This program also provides an excellent opportunity for experienced divers and instructors to continue their education.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the four types of hazardous marine life injuries
  • Name at least five venomous marine animals
  • List five common warning signs of an envenomation
  • Describe the appropriate first aid procedure for managing a venomous marine animal injury
  • Name at least three aquatic animals that may bite a diver
  • List two common warning signs of marine animal bite
  • Describe the appropriate first aid procedure for managing a bite from a marine animal
  • Name at least three marine animals that may cause irritations to the diver
  • List at least four common warning signs of irritations
  • Describe the appropriate first aid procedure for managing brushes with aquatic life
  • Identify two common types of seafood poisonings
  • Name at least three types of fish that can cause seafood poisoning
  • List three common warning signs of seafood poisoning
  • State the reason why evaluation by a medical professional is necessary when seafood poisoning is suspected
  • Describe the appropriate first aid procedures for managing suspected seafood poisoning
  • Perform a scene safety assessment
  • List the steps in performing a scene safety assessment
  • Assess the Airway, Breathing and Circulation (ABCs) of an injured diver
  • Demonstrate a caring attitude towards a diver who becomes ill or injured
  • Establish and maintain the Airway and Breathing (perform Rescue Breathing) for an injured diver
  • Describe the importance of the use of supplemental oxygen as a first aid measure for injured divers
  • Demonstrate the techniques for controlling bleeding including direct pressure, elevation and the use of pressure dressings and pressure points
  • Locate and demonstrate the use of pressure points to control external bleeding
  • Apply dressings and bandages to manage wounds caused by hazardous marine life
  • Demonstrate an ongoing assessment and manage shock
  • Demonstrate the pressure immobilisation technique
  • List the components of an Emergency Assistance Plan
  • Describe at least five techniques or guidelines that minimise the risk of injury from marine animals

The nature and scope of this course is limited to training divers and interested non-divers such as boat captains, water enthusiasts and non-diving family members to identify potential hazardous marine life, to provide first aid for a hazardous marine animal injury, and to prevent injuries caused by hazardous marine life. This course does not provide training for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or scuba diving rescue. The training exercises of this course presuppose that the ill or injured diver has already been brought to shore or is aboard the boat.

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